North Carolina Journal of International Law

"Connecting North Carolina to the World of International Law"

Shrinking Windows: China’s New Carbon Market and Global Poverty

By: Leah Kaiser               Climate change is one of the most significant barriers to the alleviation of global poverty.[1] Climate change poses an immediate threat to those that are most vulnerable in our society and is often the “trigger that tips the vulnerable into poverty.”[2]  Yet a potent tool for reducing carbon emissions and…






China and U.S. Clash Over U.N. Sanctions

By: Izzy Vaughan-Jones At the United Nations, China is locking horns with the United States’ efforts to blacklist cargo ships suspected of violating international sanctions against North Korea.[1]  The U.N. is grappling with how to respond to North Korea’s nuclear weapons.[2]  Currently, the U.S. is seeking to convince other U.N. members to take a “maximum pressure” approach towards North Korea…






United States v. The World Trade Organization

By: Joshua Bransford In recent months, the United States has been involved in a dispute with the World Trade Organization (WTO).[1]  The U.S. has voiced discontentment with the WTO Appeals Board (AB), and thus, “has blocked any new appointments to the WTO appellate body, saying WTO members must first address systemic problems with the dispute settlement mechanism.”[2]  If this action…






The Ongoing Pedra Branca Dispute: Singapore Files a New Rebuttal

By: Lenore Livingston News of the Predra Branca dispute was highlighted in the United States in the wake of the crash between the United States warship, USS John McCain, and a Liberian oil taker. Both Singapore and Malaysia claimed that the incident happened in their territorial waters and each debated which country was responsible for managing and leading search and…






UBER AND THE ILO

By: Caitlin Willen             INTRODUCTION Much like in the U.S., Uber’s status in Britain remains uncertain with regards to the legal classification of drivers as either independent contractors or workers.[1] Although an English employment tribunal recently held that Uber drivers were to be classified as “workers” rather than as independent contractors, Uber is appealing the…






President Trump’s Cuba Policy

By: Leigh Edwards After President Trump was elected into office, a Pentagon memo seemed to confirm that for the incoming Trump administration, U.S. sanctions and national security were going to be central issues.[1]  In June 2017, after publicly announcing a possible rollback of the easing of sanctions involving Cuba by the Obama Administration, it was confirmed that the Trump Administration…






How Princess Diana’s Death Implicates Current Paparazzi Laws

By: Izzy Vaughan-Jones How Princess Diana’s Death Implicates Current Paparazzi Laws 2017 marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Princess Diana.  The infamous incident occurred in Paris on August 31st, when Diana and her boyfriend were killed in an automobile accident following a high-speed car chase.  The Princess and her boyfriend Dodi Fayed were attempting to outrun the swarming…






The US’s Revised Effort for Peace in the Middle East

By: Joshua Stephens             The question of how to resolve the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians has endured on in America for decades.[1] The new administration, led by President Trump, who has long been a supporter of Israel, is now taking its crack at one of the great issues of our time.[2] In early…