Blog Posts

Blog Posts are shorter, more conversational pieces that are designed to provide a brief update on international legal issues, often centering on recent reported developments in the news. These pieces feature the author’s perspective more prominently than other pieces produced by journal staff.

Taglieri v. Monasky

Taglieri v. Monasky arose under the Hague Convention of Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction which mandates that a wrongfully removed child must be returned to their country of habitual residence.[i]While the case has been vacated upon rehearing by the Sixth Circuit, the Court temporarily held that the child at issue–A.M.T–had a habitual residence in Italy after applying a new…

Is a New Government Venezuela’s Only Hope?

Venezuela is experiencing one of the worst economic crises in history, and by far the worst in its history.[i]  With its debt exceeding over 100% of its GDP, hyperinflation over 400%, an unemployment rate around 20%, and the inability of Venezuela to repay its bond holders, Venezuela’s future economic stability looks bleak.[ii]  This economic crisis has led to a shortage…

Vol. 43 Symposium: Professor Kathryn Bradley on International Surrogacy

2017 North Carolina Journal of International Law Symposium: Professor Kathryn Bradley on International Surrogacy Reproductive tourism is estimated to be a $6 Billion a year industry, and its use by intended parents is growing, particularly through reproduction clinics and surrogates in countries with rising levels of poor women who need the extra income. At the 2017 North Carolina Journal of…

Vol. 43 Symposium: Laufer-Ukeles on Informed Consent in Surrogate Motherhood

In the problem-riddled area of international surrogacy, women’s rights are often overlooked, downplayed, and simply ignored. Professor Pamela Laufer-Ukeles in her upcoming publication, The Disembodied Womb: Pregnancy, Informed Consent, and Surrogate Motherhood (“The Disembodied Womb”), addresses the medical and legal fields’ lack of appropriate measures for protecting rights of women during and after pregnancy.[i] On October 27, 2017 the University…

Vol. 44 Symposium: Rudrappa on Commercial Surrogacy in India

On Friday, Oct. 27th, the North Carolina Journal of International Law was pleased to welcome Dr. Sharmila Rudrappa, a sociologist at the University of Texas at Austin, at its annual symposium, titled Surrogacy and International Law.  Dr. Rudrappa’s current research focuses on commercial surrogacy in India and the Indian government’s recent efforts to regulate the practice. [i] Until recently, India…

Vol. 43 Symposium: A Response to “Things That Money Can Buy”

In her paper and symposium topic, Things that Money can Buy: Reproductive Justice and the International Market for Gestational Surrogacy, Rutgers Law Professor Kimberly Mutcherson advocates for countries to adopt a realistic perspective in the international surrogacy market by treating it like the commercial transaction it undeniably is. To ensure reproductive justice for all, Mutcherson focuses her argument specifically on…

Vol. 43 Symposium: International Surrogacy and the European Court of Human Rights

The North Carolina Journal of International Law (ILJ) at the University of North Carolina held their annual symposium on October 27, 2017. The symposium this year invited scholars to speak on International Surrogacy. Professor Richard Storrow of CUNY’s School of Law specializes in human rights and reproductive justice.  He spoke at the symposium on the role the controversial but critical…

China and U.S. Clash Over U.N. Sanctions

At the United Nations, China is locking horns with the United States’ efforts to blacklist cargo ships suspected of violating international sanctions against North Korea.[i]  The U.N. is grappling with how to respond to North Korea’s nuclear weapons.[ii]  Currently, the U.S. is seeking to convince other U.N. members to take a “maximum pressure” approach towards North Korea by strangling its…