Blog Posts

Blog Posts are shorter, more conversational pieces that are designed to provide a brief update on international legal issues, often centering on recent reported developments in the news. These pieces feature the author’s perspective more prominently than other pieces produced by journal staff.

Vol. 43 Symposium: Laufer-Ukeles on Informed Consent in Surrogate Motherhood

In the problem-riddled area of international surrogacy, women’s rights are often overlooked, downplayed, and simply ignored. Professor Pamela Laufer-Ukeles in her upcoming publication, The Disembodied Womb: Pregnancy, Informed Consent, and Surrogate Motherhood (“The Disembodied Womb”), addresses the medical and legal fields’ lack of appropriate measures for protecting rights of women during and after pregnancy.[i] On October 27, 2017 the University…

Vol. 44 Symposium: Rudrappa on Commercial Surrogacy in India

On Friday, Oct. 27th, the North Carolina Journal of International Law was pleased to welcome Dr. Sharmila Rudrappa, a sociologist at the University of Texas at Austin, at its annual symposium, titled Surrogacy and International Law.  Dr. Rudrappa’s current research focuses on commercial surrogacy in India and the Indian government’s recent efforts to regulate the practice. [i] Until recently, India…

Vol. 43 Symposium: A Response to “Things That Money Can Buy”

In her paper and symposium topic, Things that Money can Buy: Reproductive Justice and the International Market for Gestational Surrogacy, Rutgers Law Professor Kimberly Mutcherson advocates for countries to adopt a realistic perspective in the international surrogacy market by treating it like the commercial transaction it undeniably is. To ensure reproductive justice for all, Mutcherson focuses her argument specifically on…

Vol. 43 Symposium: International Surrogacy and the European Court of Human Rights

The North Carolina Journal of International Law (ILJ) at the University of North Carolina held their annual symposium on October 27, 2017. The symposium this year invited scholars to speak on International Surrogacy. Professor Richard Storrow of CUNY’s School of Law specializes in human rights and reproductive justice.  He spoke at the symposium on the role the controversial but critical…

China and U.S. Clash Over U.N. Sanctions

At the United Nations, China is locking horns with the United States’ efforts to blacklist cargo ships suspected of violating international sanctions against North Korea.[i]  The U.N. is grappling with how to respond to North Korea’s nuclear weapons.[ii]  Currently, the U.S. is seeking to convince other U.N. members to take a “maximum pressure” approach towards North Korea by strangling its…

A Need for Fresh Air: The Skripals and the U.K.’s Alleged Violation of International Law

Russian officials, in response to Russia’s most recent quarrel with the United Kingdom (U.K.), claim the country is “playing with fire.”[1]  The dispute stems from the poisoning of a Russian citizen and her father on British soil.[2]  An extremely intensified version of the blame game has occurred as a consequence of the feud (which is now before the United Nations)…

Bitter Sweet Victory: Costa Rica receives limited damages in dispute with Nicaragua

Costa Rica claimed it was entitled to $6.7 million in damages due to Nicaragua’s violation of their sovereign territory in 2010.  However, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) only granted $378,890.59 in damages.  What accounts for the vast difference in the amount Costa Rica expected to collect? In 2015, the ICJ ruled that Nicaragua violated Costa Rican sovereignty by setting…

When the Size of Company Cash Stockpiles Garners Unwanted Attention

Stockpiling cash has reached historic heights for non-financial US corporations, holding over $1.5 trillion in cash and securities—over 90% of which is stashed in foreign accounts.[1] The technology industry, headed by Apple, Microsoft, Alphabet (Google’s parent company), Cisco, and Oracle account for more than 32% of that total, or approximately $600 billion in stockpiled cash.[2] Just for some added perspective,…

Shrinking Windows: China’s New Carbon Market and Global Poverty

Climate change is one of the most significant barriers to the alleviation of global poverty.[1] Climate change poses an immediate threat to those that are most vulnerable in our society and is often the “trigger that tips the vulnerable into poverty.”[2]  Yet a potent tool for reducing carbon emissions and thereby mitigating the severity of climate change remains widely unavailable…

A Kurdish Referendum

Introduction On September 25th, 2017, a referendum was held in the Kurdish region of Northern Iraq on the subject of independence.[1]  Voting took place in Kurdish provinces as well as disputed areas like the city of Kirkuk, which has significant oil resources.[2]  Kurdish troops were responsible for liberating the city from ISIS, but it has a mutli-ethnic population that includes…