North Carolina Journal of International Law

Volume 43

A Need for Fresh Air: The Skripals and the U.K.’s Alleged Violation of International Law

By: Matthew Ledford Russian officials, in response to Russia’s most recent quarrel with the United Kingdom (U.K.), claim the country is “playing with fire.”[1]  The dispute stems from the poisoning of a Russian citizen and her father on British soil.[2]  An extremely intensified version of the blame game has occurred as a consequence of the feud (which is now before…

Freedom of Speech and the Dangers of Poland’s New Holocaust Speech Law

By: Hannah Manning On Tuesday, February 6, 2018, Poland’s President Andrzej Duda signed into law an amendment to the National Remembrance Institute Law that would criminalize speech blaming Poland for Nazi Holocaust crimes.[i]  The bill “imposes up to three years in prison for associating Holocaust crimes to Poland.”[ii] The law immediately drew international ire, specifically from Israel and the United…

The Ugly Truth of Prison Reform and the Mandela Rule

To know a nation’s jail is to know the nation By: Kenneth Black As of 2016, there were more than 10.3 million people held in prisons around the world,[1] with the United States holding more than 20% of the world’s prison population, which is by far the country with the highest rate of incarceration.[2]  Despite a world trend of decreasing…

The Great Washing Machine Agitation: The USITC Recommends Tariffs

By: Daniel Maher The trouble began on June 5, 2017, when Whirlpool Corporation, a domestic producer of appliances in the United States, requested that the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) open an investigation into clothes washers that were being imported into the US.[1] The primary concern was that some domestic producers, such as Samsung and LG, were taking advantage…

International Law and Cyber Warfare: Time for an Update?

By: Robert Johnson Introduction On February 16, 2018, the Justice Department charged several Russian companies and over a dozen Russian nationals with various offenses related to their interference in the 2016 U.S. elections, with the stated goal of “spread[ing] distrust towards the candidates and the political system in general.[1]  The grand jury investigation into the issue of interference in U.S.…

Is Russia’s Meddling in the US Election an Act of Cyber Warfare?

By: Molly Rubin           What is Cyber Warfare and what are it’s Defining Qualities?                                The allegation of Russian meddling in the 2016 US Presidential election instantly galvanized* the public and incited debate on both sides of the political spectrum. As Americans, the ideals of freedom and unencumbered democracy are more than just political tenants—they are social…

Investigating Crimes Against Humanity in the Philippines and Possible Violations of the Rome Statute

By: Ariella Zulman             Introduction On February 8, 2018 the International Criminal Court (“ICC”) announced that it would be opening an investigation into a complaint alleging that Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte, along with at least eleven other governmental officials, are guilty of committing “crimes against humanity.”[1] The complaint is based on the “war on drugs”…