North Carolina Journal of International Law

"Connecting North Carolina to the World of International Law"

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Shrinking Windows: China’s New Carbon Market and Global Poverty

By: Leah Kaiser               Climate change is one of the most significant barriers to the alleviation of global poverty.[1] Climate change poses an immediate threat to those that are most vulnerable in our society and is often the “trigger that tips the vulnerable into poverty.”[2]  Yet a potent tool for reducing carbon emissions and…






China and U.S. Clash Over U.N. Sanctions

By: Izzy Vaughan-Jones At the United Nations, China is locking horns with the United States’ efforts to blacklist cargo ships suspected of violating international sanctions against North Korea.[1]  The U.N. is grappling with how to respond to North Korea’s nuclear weapons.[2]  Currently, the U.S. is seeking to convince other U.N. members to take a “maximum pressure” approach towards North Korea…






China and Japan Taking Advantage: The Fallout After the United States’ Departure From the Trans-Pacific Partnership

By: Ryan Nichols In January of this year, President Trump informed the world that the United States would be abandoning the Trans-Pacific Partnership (“TPP”).[1]  The TPP, negotiated over the course of five years by former President Barack Obama, was a proposed free trade agreement that allied the United States with eleven Pacific Rim economies.  These countries included Australia, Brunei, Canada,…






What is Next for Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies after China’s Ban?

By: Ryan Nichols               Earlier this September, China decided to place a “comprehensive ban” on the buying and selling of bitcoin exchanges;[1]  the plan is to close the exchanges by the end of September.[2]  Bitcoin is digital currency, which causes problems for regulators because it prevents them from doing their jobs by erasing the…






Can America Bring Back Industrial Jobs Without Enforcing WTO Sanctions?

By: Mike Glasser               Introduction Declining employment and production in American industry is a topic that often finds itself at the forefront of the American political sphere.  Most recently, President Trump ran a successful presidential campaign promising to bring industry jobs back to American soil.[1]  Prior to the Trump administration, however, actions to curb…






Why the “One China” Policy Still Matters

By: Alexis McGee On December 2, 2016, a short phone call between the president-elect of the United States and the president of Taiwan took place.[1]  A call that many suspect could shatter decades’ worth of U.S. policy regarding China relations and also put the diplomatic relationship on shaky ground.[2]  The China-U.S. relationship would then turn hostile when president-elect Donald Trump…






Report: Australia Moves to Ratify Extradition Treaty with China

By: Demi Davis In 2007, Australia and China signed the Treaty on Extradition between Australia and The People’s Republic of China (“Treaty”). The purpose of the Treaty was to “make more effective the cooperation of the two countries in the suppression of crime….”  Over the years, corrupt officials in China have reportedly fled to Australia after committing crimes such as…






Why China’s Abstention May Signal Future Peace in Aleppo

By; Julianna M. Charpentier The ongoing Syrian civil war, which began with pro-democracy protests in 2011 and has erupted into a multi-front war with more than 250,000 deaths, has ignited tensions far beyond Syria’s borders.[1] The United States, supporting the pro-democracy rebels, finds itself once again butting heads with Russia, who supports the regime of Bashar al-Assad.[2]  Rather than being…