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NCILJ Symposium 2019: New Developments in Immigration Law

Recent changes in immigration policies have raided the long-standing practices characteristic of American immigration courts.[i]At the annual Symposium for the North Carolina Journal of International Law and Commercial Regulation, the session on New Developments in Immigration Law brought in a variety of voices that discussed these changes.[ii]Panelists at this session included Fatma Marouf, a professor and director of the Immigrant…

NCILJ Symposium 2019: Professor Susan Akram on Challenges to Immigration Rights Advocates

The North Carolina Journal of International Law and Commercial Regulation at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill held its annual symposium on February 1, 2019.  The symposium invited scholars including Professor Susan Akram to speak on discrete issues in immigration law. Professor Susan Akram at Boston University School of Law directs BU Law’s International Human Rights Clinic where…

NCILJ Symposium 2019: Panel on Environmental Migration

The North Carolina Journal of International Law’s annual symposium on February 1, 2019 featured a panel discussion on environmental migration, moderated by UNC School of Law’s Professor Deborah Weissman. The speakers for the environmental migration panel included Elizabeth Ferris, who serves as a research professor with the Institute for the Study of Internal Migration at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign…

NCILJ Symposium 2019: The Statelessness of Hill Tribes in Thailand

The issue of statelessness plagues many individuals in Thailand.[i]While the exact number is not known, it is estimated that well over one million individuals lack Thai citizenship.[ii]Many of the individuals who lack citizenship are members of Thailand’s northern hill tribes.[iii]Thailand’s northern hill tribes include members of the Akna, Lanu, Lisu, Yao, Shan, Hmong, and Karen ethnic communities.[iv]Although these hill tribes…